Queen Charlotte – African Presence in British Royalty

The riddle of Queen Charlotte’s African ancestry was solved as a result of an investigation into the black magi. A great debt of gratitude is owed the History Department of McGill University. They found at least half a dozen quotes by Queen Charlotte’s contemporaries, regarding her Africoid features. Because of its “scientific” source, the most valuable references would probably be the one published in the autobiography of the Queen’s personal physician, Baron Stockmar, where he described her as having “…a true mulatto face.

Perhaps the most literary of these allusions to her African appearance, however, can be found in the poem penned to her on the occasion of her wedding to King George III and the Coronation celebration that immediately followed:

Descended from the warlike Vandal race,
She still preserves that title in her face.
Tho’ shone their triumphs o’er Numidia’s plain,
And and Alusian fields their name retain;
They but subdued the southern world with arms,
She conquers still with her triumphant charms,
O! born for rule, – to whose victorious brow
The greatest monarch of the north must bow.

(It should be noted: that the Royal Household itself, at the time of Queen Elizabeth II’s coronation, referred to both her Asian and African bloodlines in an apologia it published defending her position as head of the Commonwealth.)

The Africoid characteristics of the Queen’s portraits certainly had political significance since artists of that period were expected to downplay, soften or even obliterate undesirable features in a subjects’s face.

Sir Allan Ramsay was the artist responsible for the majority of the paintings of Queen Charlotte. Ramsay deliberately emphasised “mulatto features” which the queen supposedly inherited via descent from a 13th-century “Moorish” ancestor. It has been suggested that copies of these paintings were sent to the colonies to be used by abolitionists as a de facto support for their cause.

Portrait of Dido Elizabeth Belle Lindsay (left) (1761-1804) and her cousin Lady Elizabeth Murray (right) (1760-1825). The original is in Scone Palace, Perthshire, Scotland.

Portrait of Dido Elizabeth Belle Lindsay (left) (1761-1804) and her cousin Lady Elizabeth Murray (right) (1760-1825). Dido Elizabeth Belle Lindsay is the niece of Lord Mansfield and the wife of Sir Allen Ramsey.

Ramsey was an anti-slavery intellectual of his day. He also married the niece of Dido Elizabeth Belle, the niece of Lord Mansfield. Mansfield was the English judge whose 1772 decision was the first in a series of rulings that finally ended slavery in the British Empire.

With features as conspicuously Africoid as they were reputed to be by her contemporaries, it is no wonder that the “black” community, both in the U.S. and throughout the British Commonwealth, have rallied around pictures of Queen Charlotte for generations. They have pointed out the physiological traits that so obviously identify the ethnic strain of the Queen.

Enough evidence was accumulated to propose that the models for the black magi were, in all probability, members of the Portuguese de Sousa family.

Six different lines can be traced from English Queen Charlotte back to Margarita de Castro y Sousa, in a gene pool which because of royal inbreeding was already minuscule, thus explaining the Queen’s unmistakable African appearance.


More About Queen Charlotte

Charlotte of Mecklenburg-Strelitz (Sophia Charlotte; 1744 – 1818) was the wife of King George III. She was a direct descendent from Margarita de Castro y Sousa, an African or Moorish branch of the Portuguese Royal House.

She was Queen of Great Britain and Ireland from her marriage in 1761 until the union of the two kingdoms in 1801, after which she was Queen of the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Ireland until her death in 1818.

She was also the Electress of Hanover in the Holy Roman Empire until the promotion of her husband to King of Hanover on October 12th, 1814, after which she was also queen consort of Hanover.

Her husband King George III was the king of Great Britain during the defeat of France in the Seven Years’ War, (becoming the dominant European power in North America and India) and the American Revolutionary War fighting the 13 colonies.

Charlotte of Mecklenburg-Strelitz

Charlotte of Mecklenburg-Strelitz

Nature Knows No Color Line By: Joel Augustus Rogers (a link to the ebook in under the sources)

Nature Knows No Color Line By: Joel Augustus Rogers (a link to the ebook is under the sources)

Nature Knows No Color Line By: Joel Augustus Rogers (a link to the ebook in under the sources)

Nature Knows No Color Line By: Joel Augustus Rogers (a link to the ebook is under the sources)



Sources
:
http://www.macquirelatory.com/Nature_Knows_No_Colorline.pdf
http://www.pbs.org/wgbh/pages/frontline/shows/secret/famous/royalfamily.html
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Allan_Ramsay_(artist)#Abolitionism_and_paintings_of_Queen_Charlotte
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Charlotte_of_Mecklenburg-Strelitz
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/George_III_of_the_United_Kingdom



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